• Welcome

    Welcome to Get:Outdoors Native Watercraft Owner's Group. This site is brought to you by Get:Outdoors, a Native Watercraft™ dealer based out of central North Carolina. We have a simple goal – to provide our customers a wealth of information to aid in the purchase and use of Native Watercraft products. Be sure to visit our forum and register to become a member.
  • Sliming the Slayer

    Out of the blue last week, Woody calls me up and says, “Hey, we need to get some fishing shots of the Slayers in action…do you wanna help?” Well, yeah. So I get up with Philip (yak4fish) and we start planning.
    As things played out, I got up with the Native Watercraft company photographer, Tim, Wednesday evening and helped him set up camp. I had hopes that Woody would be able to break away from the office early and I would get to take a test run in the Slayers that evening…but that didn’t happen, so our plan was to meet at sun-up Thursday so we could be on the water at first light.

    Bright and early everything worked out and came together...Philip got the Slayer 12 and I got the 14.5. Woody chauffeured Tim around so he could capture the best light as Philip and I fished. This is the time of year all the smaller bass in the area lakes school up to feed on huge schools of shad. So we should have figured that pounding the banks may not pay off…but at least the light was good. After we wore the cove out with not a single bite, I decided to try and hit an area across the main branch we were in to see if we could locate some shad.

    The morning light was golden and the clouds were slowly but surely burning off. Hopefully the evening wouldn’t be spoiled by the predicted possibility of heavy showers and thunderstorms. We finally made the crossing and started beating the shoreline again, but this time I had a bit more confidence we may see some schooling fish.

    This water was a bit shallower, so I decided to try to stand in this boat…all 6’ 3” and 270 lbs of me. I brought a heavy nylon webbing dog leash…yep, a dog leash…and attached it to the hard front handle. Grabbing the leash and pulling while I hefted my bulk was a breeze…I could stand with no problems. I could tell the boat was slightly more tippy than an Ultimate…but not by much. Then I placed the seat into the raised position…and the higher stance gave me a better view of the water and gave me a more comfortable fishing position without losing much if any stability.
    I was be bopping around when Philip said he spotted a big school of shad out a ways from where we were. We got out into position and suddenly the water erupted with bass busting small shad. I managed to get a Zara Puppy into them and boom…fish on. The Slayer’s first bass.

    Not a monster by any means…but you got to start somewhere! Tim shot a bunch of photos, and then we got back to business. The next thing we knew, a big school of fish busted all around Philips boat. I flipped a lure into them and again I had a good fish on. It jumped several times and was a solid 3 pound football of a fish when all the sudden the line went limp just feet from my hands. Well that happens…it’s called fishing. The rest of the morning was about as productive as squat. I managed a couple more dinks, but it was SLOW to say the least.
    I knew the morning bite was over…and the evening bite wouldn’t start till around 4-ish…so we decided to bag up all the boats and gear and send them on to a local river. ..the Uwharrie.


    We decided to put in at a new access and paddle the boats up stream to several sets of shoals. I hadn’t even had time to get the boat wet hardly before I had a nice little smallmouth on. Tim and Woody hadn’t even hauled their boat to the water yet so Philip pulled his camera out to shoot the fish.

    As we worked our way upstream, Philip hit a nice looking eddy and got his first smallmouth. The water was very low but the boats were able to float in next to no water at all and easily maneuvered their way through the rocky shoals.

    We worked our way up a mile or so till the river turned into a shallow rock garden. This section runs a long way so we decided to work our way back down. I was really impressed at how easily the 14.5’ boat turned as I worked on down a set of shoals. The stability was excellent and at one point I decided to mess a bit and see just how far I could lean the boat before having to slap a brace down. I could set it all the way on its side till water ran into the cockpit area. Not to be outdone, Philip decided to run that set of rapids…standing. No problems. He made it look too easy.
    It wasn’t long before we were reminded of the unfortunate weather forecast. Thunder was booming off in the distance so we decided to get off the river and load the boats up and go check on the radar to see where the storms were. Once we were able to get a phone signal, we could see small storms popping up all around us, but the lake looked hopeful, so we decided to head on back to where we started the day and see if we could get back into some schooling fish. I decided it was time to see how well the 12’ Slayer could handle someone my size…a Clydesdale…270 pounds of mean lean paddle ’n machine…along with 25 pounds of drinks, rods and reels, and tackle. No problems.

    Philip got to get into the 14.5 too. We made our way back out to where we got into that morning school of largemouth and watched a big storm form to the north of us. We pulled up the radar again on the cell phone and figured we would be good this go round. As lightening shot out of the clouds way off in the distance, the fish came up as singles hitting shad up near the surface. At one point, a big school of shad busted just out of casting reach and wouldn’t you know it, stripers busted into them. Philip and I both tried to get to them before they went down but no luck. We waited and watched some more…and looked back off in the distance and decided one cloud was going to nail us. We could see the rain dumping out of it. Woody called it…let’s get out of here! We started cranking on our paddles and right then a decent bass hit 20 yards from Philip and I. I slapped the old trusty turkey quill epoxy fly on him and instantly I had the fish on. Woody got Tim into photography position and he let the camera shutter fly. I got the fish in and we wasted no time getting the boats moving again. The rain was coming and it was coming hard. It was raining so hard off in the distance that the islands out in the lake were gone…they just vanished into the gray of the rain. And we cranked. Woody pulled ahead of me in his Marvel 14.5 and Philip was making his way towards the far shore. I was just going to get wet. I could hear the rain coming…gaining on me from behind. I just kept on cranking. Once it got to me…there was no sense in killing myself. It was a cold hard rain; the kind that cleansed and stung a bit as it hit. Woody and Philip pulled away and I just cruised along enjoying it all…it was all good. The boats were good…the fishing was good, we got to slime both boats…and the fellowship between paddlers was good; it had been a long time since I had seen or talked with Tim, and a decade since I had seen Woody. Philip and I had a great time…now we have to decide on a Slayer 12 or 14.5…or both…but like you…we’ll have to wait till they are in full production. The target date is the end of this month.
    Comments 10 Comments
    1. PhotoFish's Avatar
      I have a concern about the paddling speed and hull slap...........when I saw a video of the Slayer being paddled it was pushing a lot of water instead of cutting through it. My impression it would be very slow....

      What was your evaluation?
    1. boykinsbuddy's Avatar
      Look at the 3rd shot of Philip paddling across the lake at cruising speed. We were going along at a fairly good clip. Look at the amount of water the bow is pushing. Now remember this hull was made for the river. That is actually very little water getting pushed for a river boat. Hull slap...yes, there is some hull slap but again the bow is made for rising up over waves...it is not going to be as quiet as an Ultimate or a Manta Ray.
      Both of these boats were from the Outdoor Retailer's Show. It was my understanding that 2 of each were made. As soon as they got back, R&D took 2 of them and cut them up to test hull thicknesses in areas where parts are going to be screwed in. The 12' boat we had was from the production mold. The 14.5' was out of a glass mold and was a bit deformed...as you can figure, fiberglass is not really made to be put into an oven. It can not take the heat an aluminum mold will take. They have to lower the temps in the oven or the glass will burn up, so the plastic doesn't have the same properties as it would getting baked at the right temperature for the right amount of time. So the hull can easily warp...and this one was. SO...it was difficult to truly judge the hull speed of the 14.5. I was really paying attention to stuff like this and asked a bunch of questions. I would place the hull speed of the 14.5 somewhere between the Ultimate 14.5 and the Manta Ray. I actually thought the 12' boat paddled close to the same as the 14.5, but Philip thought the 14.5 was a lot faster. Woody assured me that the 14.5 out of the Aluminum production mold would be much quicker. When it started to rain, I was in the 12 and initially I had no problem keeping up with the 14.5 and the Marvel 14.5 Woody was in...but I was cranking really hard using torso twist and every trick I knew to make my stroke more efficient. I stayed up with them for about 10 minutes or so then Woody started pulling away...then Philip.
      Let me talk about the 12 first. I am looking for a small pond boat and river boat. Everything I have is a 14.5 long boat. I borrowed a Wilderness Systems Ride 115 from Get:Outdoors...the boat hulls are nothing alike. The Ride's seat was their deluxe seat...but it felt as hard as a rock. We all know how nice the First Class seat is. The Ride's bow also wagged back and forth with each paddle stroke. No wagging what so ever with the Slayer 12. The Slayer paddles straight as an arrow and that really impressed me. A 12' boat normally requires correction strokes...especially once the hull reaches top speed. Not the Slayer. I just shake my head in disbelief paddling it because it doesn't paddle like a flat bottomed short hull. The 12' boat feels to me a lot like the Ultimate 14.5 as far as hull resistance and efficiency but it is actually better than the Ultimate because the hull doesn't wander like the Ultimate does. It doesn't have tremendous glide...but you wouldn't expect that from a 12' boat.
      Maneuverability... it is very maneuverable. It can spin in place with just a wide sweep of the paddle. Again...a boat this maneuverable shouldn't paddle as straight as it does...but it does.
      How does it handle weight...I weigh 270 and I'm 6'3" tall. It did fantastic. The Ride did great too...but sat a little low in the stern. The Slayer sits perfect with the seat in the low position...a bit lower in the stern with the seat in the raised position. And speaking of the seat in the raised position...the hull is still very stable and very predictable. Standing is easy with a grab strap attached to the bow for me...easier for someone like Philip that weighs 100lbs less.
      How does the boat handle waves? Well I sat back at one point heading back out into the lake. A big run-about power boat was coming out of the cove and I wanted to see how the boat handled the waves. It came off of plane as it approached us and threw a big set of waves then cruised by throwing a big wake. Just what I wanted. The Slayer rode over the waves with no problems. No water broke over the bow and was very predictable and stable.
      Philip paddled the 12 on the river. He ran a class 1 rock garden with a decent drop standing in the boat. Not me...but he did it with no problems. And the boat has a definite point of secondary stability. You can place your weight standing on one foot and use the other to adjust your weight for the conditions.
      Going into this thing...I was aboput 99% certain I would have to just stick with the longer boats because of my weight. But I was so impressed with the 12 for what I want to use it for...I will get the Slayer 12 first. It was very stable...it tracked like it shouldn't and maneuvered like it should.
    1. PhotoFish's Avatar
      Wow, great response!

      Sounds like the 12 might be the one I"m looking for, something that will fit inside my van too....

      I previously called my local dealer and they didn't even know about the new Slayer so I don't think I will get to test one this fall, if at all.

      Thanks again for the review!
    1. boykinsbuddy's Avatar
      OK...the Slayer 14.5. I spent most of the day in this boat. As I mentioned earlier, this hull was a prototype that was molded in a fiberglass mold made from the original plug. This was the hull that all of the Native endorsed guides got to paddle and make recommendations on. One of their comments was that the hull was a bit noisy and this has been addressed in the final plug that is sent to make the aluminum molds. The bottom of this hull is basically a longer version of the Slayer 12. Since it molded from a fiberglass mold and was substantially used and abused, the bottom was a bit oil-canned. This will slow the hull down some, but overall performance will be close to the same.
      As soon as I got the boat in the water, I messed around a bit with it paying attention to how well it would accelerate, how well it tracked, turned, etc. It picks up hull speed fine. It is not as fast as a Manta Ray 14, faster than an Ultimate 14.5, and I would say about the same as a Redfish 14. It tracks very well. I had no issues what so ever keeping it straight and saw no wagging in the bow with hard paddle strokes. It stops easily and turns on a dime. I again was very impressed with how well the boat turns and still tracks when it is supposed to. The hull does not wander at any speed and has a decent glide...not great...but I would not expect it with the maneuverability it has.
      We had some decent wind in the morning and the boat paddled nicely into the wind. When the lake started having small whitecaps, the hull rose over the waves well and only a few small splashes hit the deck, but the hull felt very solid with no noticeable flexing that I can feel in an Ultimate 14.5. I did not notice any weathervaning.
      On the river...I was very impressed with the shallow draft of the hull. Its maneuverability made negotiating the shoals a breeze. It was very stable in the current and sitting in the high seat position did not make the hull feel any more tippy. When I first saw the hull in the photos from the Outdoor Retailers Show, I saw that funky little chine on the bottom edge of the sides right below the waterline. I thought ...boy...that thing is going to be grabby in the current. This is the same little edge that you see in today's whitewater boats. Well I was wrong. The boat does not feel grabby at all. At no point did I think the hull felt tippy. I even laid the thing over as far on its side just to test the secondary stability. It has an excellent catch point and one can lean the boat even further to the point of dumping water over the side into the foot and seat well...without flipping it. Where does this come in handy? Well negotiate a shallow narrow rock garden and put the boat up on edge to fit between rocks so you don't have to get out and drag. And to think you are doing this in a 14.5' long boat...very impressive.
      Does it whip into eddies? No...it takes a good sweep to make it turn but it does turn with a single good sweep...it doesn't take multiple sweeps. Something you will notice with these longer hulled boats is that normally it takes a good bit of effort to turn them. Say you are cruising along and see a spot you want to fish...and it is a hard 90 degrees to the side of where you are going. Most hulls will require multiple sweeps to get the boat slowed down and turned. The Slayer takes a single wide sweep.
      Where is this longer hull going to shine? While paddling it, I was thinking about the Black River here in NC down on the Cape Fear. That is a swamp type river that has loads of current pushing through cypress trees and knees, and loads of other swamp bushes and vines...and loads of poison ivy growing off of every old stump. You need a boat that can track at times but also has to be very maneuverable...This boat is perfect for swamp paddling. Loaded with about 300 pounds of paddler and gear, it drafts about 3 inches of water...that is a ton better than the Ultimate. Now place the boat in the waters you paddle...flats and mangrove swamps on the gulf...the coastal estuaries and salt creeks holding all those redfish and trout...this hull is perfect!
      Flats fishermen will love this boat. The shallow draft, the flat uncluttered floor in front of the seat, the ability to stop quickly and turn quickly...it is going to be a real winner. Not to mention that you can easily stand and sight fish from it too.
      Is it going to be the perfect open water boat? I don't think it is as nice as the Manta Ray 14 for big open water. The Ray cuts through waves quietly and rides the swells better than any other Native boat. More than likely out on the open water, you will have the seat in the low position...and I like the Manta's deluxe wedge seat in this low paddling position better than the First Class seat...but that is just me. The Ray is also a faster hull but is not as stable because it is a good 2 inches narrower than the Slayer 14.5.
      I see the hull fitting nicely between the Ultimate 14.5 and the Manta Ray 14. The weight capacity is not going to be an issue. I am an Old Magic 14.5 fan. Any of you that had or have this hull know the load it can haul. The Slayer14.5 is going to be close. The trunk wells are very large and it will be able to haul some serious camping gear. The fitted bow bag is excellent and fits the well perfectly. It is large enough to store some big fish too. If you are a one boat person...this is the boat to get. It will handle open water decently, is very maneuverable, very stable, and very comfortable in any seat position, and you can still stand and fish from it. I have a fleet of boats...I can see getting rid of one of the Magics...but not both. I see using the Slayer as the main fishing boat, but will keep the Manta Ray for just open water paddling or ocean fishing. For me, I can see the Slayer getting used more than my Ultimate...but that is me. I know the Ultimate has a huge following, but my clan of 5 paddle more than fish...and they like a better performing hull than what the Ultimate delivers...so I see my Ultimate getting left at home more once I get the Slayer in the fleet.
      I can't comment on the outfitting since the hulls we had were prototypes and basically stripped. I hope they have at least one paddle taco on them. I would like to have one on each side...one for the paddle and one for a stake-out pole or push pole. I do know that they are going to have plenty of Groove tracks for any accessories you may want to use. The hard handles are EXCELLENT...they need to be on all the boats!
      I can't wait for the boats to be in full production. I need a full blown river boat so I will get the Slayer 12 first, but come springtime, I'll make room for the Slayer 14.5 too.
    1. livelybaits's Avatar
      People have different needs. I have to take people out fishing potentially in areas that are exposed to wind. So I do not have a great desire to have a fleet full of 12 foot boats. For people who stay in protected areas they may never have the need to have a longer boat and in tighter areas they may prefer the 12.

      I have only paddled the 12 back in initial prototype stage. I had it out in the wind that day. They told me they were doing a manipulation to hull design because of tracking but I was surprised by this. I intentionally paddled it cross-wind to see how it tracked. It layed in the water better than probably any other boat I have ever had.

      No access to the 14 foot model at that time, I can only infer what I think the speed of that boat will be. As logic goes, I believe that based on what the speed of the 12 prototype was, I'll be pleased with the handling, tracking and speed of the longer version.

      I have discussions like this regularly as people are choosing boats. The bottom line is that you can't really have it all. Not in most cases. There are some people that what they described I told them "That exists but not in a fishing kayak." If you want speed, you can have it but if you are a fisherman, you have to realize that you may be risking a turnover and losing your gear. It's about sacrifices in your choices. For me personally as well as my clients, I know that boats I put them in with get the job done but at a zero risk of having a fortune in rods, reels and equipment lost.

      I have only had one client turn over a kayak in the last six years. That was a blatant "user error" (this guy called this week to book again, since he will be visiting. He moved away about three years ago).

      In the course of discussion with people I have figured out that some people would be happier in something that is under power. They just may not have it in them to paddle. That's just simply a reality for some people. It is rare but possible. Paddling a kayak is not extreme exertion but it is not as simple as putting a throttle into gear and something else doing the propulsion.

      In so much of what I teach, it brings in knowledge of your conditions and good planning. I see it all the time. People do not know what a tide is (and thus current direction) or they don't "use the wind" in their favor. You have to do a certain amount of work if you are getting out in the elements but if you have the right plan, you nullify doing harder work the entire time out there.
    1. knobcreekman's Avatar
      Thanks everyone for the excellent write-ups and reviews. I am very excited about this kayak. It looks like it will be the perfect one (for me anyway).
    1. fishnwild's Avatar
      Quote Originally Posted by boykinsbuddy View Post
      Look at the 3rd shot of Philip paddling across the lake at cruising speed. We were going along at a fairly good clip. Look at the amount of water the bow is pushing. Now remember this hull was made for the river. That is actually very little water getting pushed for a river boat. Hull slap...yes, there is some hull slap but again the bow is made for rising up over waves...it is not going to be as quiet as an Ultimate or a Manta Ray.
      Both of these boats were from the Outdoor Retailer's Show. It was my understanding that 2 of each were made. As soon as they got back, R&D took 2 of them and cut them up to test hull thicknesses in areas where parts are going to be screwed in. The 12' boat we had was from the production mold. The 14.5' was out of a glass mold and was a bit deformed...as you can figure, fiberglass is not really made to be put into an oven. It can not take the heat an aluminum mold will take. They have to lower the temps in the oven or the glass will burn up, so the plastic doesn't have the same properties as it would getting baked at the right temperature for the right amount of time. So the hull can easily warp...and this one was. SO...it was difficult to truly judge the hull speed of the 14.5. I was really paying attention to stuff like this and asked a bunch of questions. I would place the hull speed of the 14.5 somewhere between the Ultimate 14.5 and the Manta Ray. I actually thought the 12' boat paddled close to the same as the 14.5, but Philip thought the 14.5 was a lot faster. Woody assured me that the 14.5 out of the Aluminum production mold would be much quicker. When it started to rain, I was in the 12 and initially I had no problem keeping up with the 14.5 and the Marvel 14.5 Woody was in...but I was cranking really hard using torso twist and every trick I knew to make my stroke more efficient. I stayed up with them for about 10 minutes or so then Woody started pulling away...then Philip.
      Let me talk about the 12 first. I am looking for a small pond boat and river boat. Everything I have is a 14.5 long boat. I borrowed a Wilderness Systems Ride 115 from Get:Outdoors...the boat hulls are nothing alike. The Ride's seat was their deluxe seat...but it felt as hard as a rock. We all know how nice the First Class seat is. The Ride's bow also wagged back and forth with each paddle stroke. No wagging what so ever with the Slayer 12. The Slayer paddles straight as an arrow and that really impressed me. A 12' boat normally requires correction strokes...especially once the hull reaches top speed. Not the Slayer. I just shake my head in disbelief paddling it because it doesn't paddle like a flat bottomed short hull. The 12' boat feels to me a lot like the Ultimate 14.5 as far as hull resistance and efficiency but it is actually better than the Ultimate because the hull doesn't wander like the Ultimate does. It doesn't have tremendous glide...but you wouldn't expect that from a 12' boat.
      Maneuverability... it is very maneuverable. It can spin in place with just a wide sweep of the paddle. Again...a boat this maneuverable shouldn't paddle as straight as it does...but it does.
      How does it handle weight...I weigh 270 and I'm 6'3" tall. It did fantastic. The Ride did great too...but sat a little low in the stern. The Slayer sits perfect with the seat in the low position...a bit lower in the stern with the seat in the raised position. And speaking of the seat in the raised position...the hull is still very stable and very predictable. Standing is easy with a grab strap attached to the bow for me...easier for someone like Philip that weighs 100lbs less.
      How does the boat handle waves? Well I sat back at one point heading back out into the lake. A big run-about power boat was coming out of the cove and I wanted to see how the boat handled the waves. It came off of plane as it approached us and threw a big set of waves then cruised by throwing a big wake. Just what I wanted. The Slayer rode over the waves with no problems. No water broke over the bow and was very predictable and stable.
      Philip paddled the 12 on the river. He ran a class 1 rock garden with a decent drop standing in the boat. Not me...but he did it with no problems. And the boat has a definite point of secondary stability. You can place your weight standing on one foot and use the other to adjust your weight for the conditions.
      Going into this thing...I was aboput 99% certain I would have to just stick with the longer boats because of my weight. But I was so impressed with the 12 for what I want to use it for...I will get the Slayer 12 first. It was very stable...it tracked like it shouldn't and maneuvered like it should.
      Just looking for the specs on the 12 ? Weight mainly. Is this boat going to be in the same weight class as the manta ? This may be one of the deciding factors when river fishing and having to carry around obstacles. From what I've read the cuda is about the same weight as the manta and a bit more stander friendly.
    1. boykinsbuddy's Avatar
      The hull is supposed to come in somewhere between 60-70lbs. They mold several hulls, check the thicknesses in key areas to make sure they are thick enough...and adjust from there...so the exact weight isn't out yet. I think they know it but haven't announced it yet since they said boats will be shipped by the end of this month. Capacity wise...I think it will be well over 300 true pounds. A 300 pound paddler will be able to use the boat with no issues. I had right at 300 pounds of me and tackle and gear and camera equipment in the boat and it was floating high with no waves breaking over the bow.
      http://kayakfishingnc.com/wp-content...09/Image02.jpg
    1. Morgette's Avatar
      I just received my Ultimate 14.5 Tandem and now I want the 14' Slayer too. Dang ... my wife is gonna kill me.
    1. Snaggedagain's Avatar
      Looks like a very nice boat. Also looks looks like an obvious Coosa ripoff.
  • Currently Active UsersCurrently Active Users

    There are currently 53 users online. 6 members and 47 guests

    1. Aggie01
    2. Basscat77
    3. four
    4. paddlingtech
    5. superhawk1
    6. Tupong
  • Ultimate FX: Solo & Tandem

  • Recent Forum Posts

    Aggie01

    Local dealer was out of the Manta Ray and was told by Native that they have temporarily stopped new production of the Manta Ray model because they are

    Native suspending production of Manta Ray?

    Aggie01 Today 05:15 PM Go to last post
    Aggie01

    Native MR owners need advice. I am sure before you bought your Manta Ray you demo a few boats. Demo the Manta Ray 14 and WS Tarpon 140. Having hard

    Manta Ray 14 Advice: Trying to make a Decision.

    Aggie01 Today 05:10 PM Go to last post
    boykinsbuddy

    I think it is a good product. It really makes rigging or de-rigging with a fish finder quick. It also gives you the option to move from one boat to another.

    Cell Block ?

    boykinsbuddy Today 04:33 PM Go to last post
    four

    I have been scouring this site looking for various rigging ideas once my 12FX gets here. There is lot's of good info on here. My impulse is to order the

    Cell Block ?

    four Today 04:13 PM Go to last post
    rick67

    I hope they switch to stainless. The seals today don't use very good synthetic materials and leak way to fast. I'll wait to see where it goes before

    Attention Slayer Propel Owners who fish the salt water!

    rick67 Today 03:26 PM Go to last post
  • Site Sponsors